WAD

Yesterday was World Autism Day, and I’d like, belatedly, to talk a bit about Joey and his autism. I heard a researcher on the radio earlier this week talking about how even in autistic kids who regress, when you look back, you can see signs going back into their infancy; although we didn’t know how to read them at the time, certainly this was true for Joey. Joint attention is one thing they particularly lack—Joey was very rarely willing to look at things we pointed out, or to take an interest in things that we were interested in. Mr. Book and I thought that he just wasn’t interested, and respected that without realizing that it was a problem. As a baby, Joey was much more interested in looking at walls and ceilings than at faces—mine or anyone else’s—I remember blithely describing this to someone before we had any idea. The Mister and I were so willing to accept that he had his own agenda that we never knew that we ought to be worried. Now, in Kit, I see a person with his own agenda who also is socially engaged and attentive to the things that others find interesting; had they been born in the opposite order, we could have gotten help for Joey much sooner. Or, of course, if we hadn’t placed Cricket. . . .

Joey is an unbelievably sweet and mellow little dude. I know that I say this all the time, usually using exactly those words, but it is the perfect truth; everybody likes Joey. He has made almost no progress in speech over the last six months, still using only about thirty single words, and his articulation is poor; he is sensory seeking in just about every way, pressing his stomach against things to feel them especially and drinking unattended hot sauce; he is more and more dancing, grooving and perfectly self absorbed in his happiness; he likes to read to himself, and resents being read to. He’s a peach.

I would make Joey not autistic if I could, but he’s an unbelievable gift, no matter what hardship he has in his life—I am the luckiest in my sons.